Fork me on GitHub
#cider
<
2016-03-26
>
arrdem01:03:23

So I'm (finally) taking a swing at this issue... would someone be so kind as to enlighten me about how to hack forward-sexpr as hinted here? https://github.com/clojure-emacs/clojure-mode/issues/367#issuecomment-197722557

arrdem01:03:49

I've got a tiny diff to clojure--loking-at-non-logical-sexp that seems to do the trick, but not sure what the "desired" outcome is here.

j0ni02:03:59

I wish aggressive-indent-mode didn't slow down editing on big fns/files

j0ni02:03:14

I love it, but it's painful on much of the code I work on 😞

bozhidar10:03:32

I think only big fns cause the slowdown

bozhidar10:03:41

in a way it motivates you to write better code

jonpither11:03:27

I've found a complicated bug in cider-nrepl / tools-nrepl that is very minor and only affects people running tests in CIDER against CIDER-nrepl

jonpither12:03:16

Basically cider-test when you run tests, ends up doing an interruptable-eval in order to run the tests. Now imagine the thing you are testing fires up a new nREPL server and at some point we do another interruptable-eval.... The problem is that when tools.nrepl creates a session, it sticks (get-thread-bindings) into the session map; (get-thread-bindings) contains stuff setup by the outer eval (such as msg). This messes with the inner-eval, in particular the msg in the session takes priority over the explicit (binding [msg msg]) that interruptable-eval does. The msg binding is used by the printwriter setup in the nrepl session-middleware. This means that for the inner-eval std out and std error are redirected to the transport used by the OUTER eval, not the inner.

jonpither12:03:52

in tools.nrepl, changing this fixes it: (merge baseline-bindings (dissoc (get-thread-bindings) #'agent)) -> (merge baseline-bindings (dissoc (get-thread-bindings) #'agent #'msg))

jonpither12:03:47

interuptable-eval/*msg* has no business being in the nrepl session. It's only here by accident via the outer/inner eval scenario, and it creates adverse effects. I'll stew on it for a bit and consider raising an issue at tools.nrepl

fommil23:03:24

is it normal to see the cider JVM CPU spike every time I'm typing in Emacs? I'm hacking on a laptop and I really notice it because I'm on a laptop and my fan kicks in. I have the flycheck modes enabled

fommil23:03:13

I save the file a lot, force of habit

fommil23:03:47

hmm, also, there are two JVMs when I start cider. One is the launcher? It's just eating up 600MB of RAM