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#emacs
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2020-08-21
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practicalli-john00:08:17

Are there any videos that show how people are using clojure-lsp for Clojure development in Emacs / Spacemacs? I haven't found anything yet. I have seen lots of positive comments on how benefitial clojure-lsp is, but I am not getting that sense myself. I've just spend another hour today experimenting with clojure-lsp and found the experience a little confusing and quite distracting, so must be doing something wrong. Any guidance on how to actually use and make sense of the information its displaying?

ericdallo13:08:25

I don't known any videos of clojure-lsp 😕 but there is the lsp-mode documentation for emacs which has some images and if you keep searching you can find videos about it. Take a look on the main features: https://emacs-lsp.github.io/lsp-mode/page/main-features/

mpenet12:08:24

I tried, but cider is miles ahead. I found some things a bit too intrusive, like all the overlays (# of references & co)

ericdallo13:08:15

You can disable this feature setting lsp-lens-enable to nil

ericdallo13:08:27

Almost every lsp-mode features can be disabed

practicalli-john22:08:02

I am struggling to understand which parts are which, I ended up switching it all off until I have more time to experiment. There was too much conflicting with Cider, autocomplete and yasnippets. It’s purely down to not understanding LSP enough, no reflection on the Clojure-lsp project, which seems great and potential very useful once I understand what’s going on. Maybe later in the year I’ll try again when I have more time.

😄 3
mpenet12:08:00

some things are quite nice, I guess a mix of both approaches would be nice (a bit like in cursive)

ericdallo13:08:47

You can use clojure-lsp + cider 🙂

bozhidar05:08:16

Or anakondo + cider (if the static analysis is all you need from clojure-lsp).

👍 6
practicalli-john08:08:00

I found anakondo less intrusive and easier to understand. I assume Clojure-lsp is doing more / visualising more by default, so more of a learning curve.