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#spacemacs
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2018-09-01
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practicalli-john00:09:26

@drewverlee the default comment for a line in Clojure is ;;. If you use M-; or SPC ; ; or g c c then you will comment a line with ;;. My personal view is that commenting lines with a single semi-colon is incorrect syntax for Clojure / ClojureScript code and I would refactor all the comments to be the correct syntax as a separate commit. Updating your project in this way would be an opportunity to use iedit more.

Chase01:09:04

iedit looks useful. is it kind of like the global substitution capability in vim? or actually it sounds more like neovim's where it shows you what the changes would look like in real time, huh?

practicalli-john06:09:01

@chase-lambert iedit can do some great thing and is even more powerful when you use with narrowing, SPC n menu. If you want to change multiple things just in one region or function, you can use narrow to bring up a temporary buffer to make your changes in. When you have finished making your iedit (or other changed) you widen, SPC n w and return to the original buffer with you changes in place.

Chase01:09:19

and I apologize if I've asked this here before but in terms of using spacemacs/cider, when I run across a random tutorial or project on github that I want to tinker with it almost always at some point says "and just run lein repl and do this..." If I use lein to create the project but then use cider jack-in while in the project in Spacemacs then am I getting the exact same functionality as I would be if I was just using lein repl in my regular terminal?

pauld02:09:12

yes, but you have all the cider-emacs stuff, clojure mode and whatever else is included in the spacemacs clojure layer.

practicalli-john06:09:51

@chase-lambert to reiterate on what @pauld said, you get more functionality, but yes, where you see lein repl you can use cider-jack-in instead. cider-jack-in is the same as running lein repl in a terminal and then running cider-connect to connect your editor to the REPL (using the nrepl protocol). This connection allows you to evaluate Clojure code in a an Emacs buffer as well as have an interactive repl buffer. When Emacs is connected to the REPL you have the full development experience.