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#off-topic
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2021-02-27
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jaihindhreddy06:02:50

Simplicity (decomplectedness?) AFAIK is one of the fundamental principles behind Clojure. And yet, to my surprise, there's no mention of it on http://clojure.org. Is there an official written "argument for simplicity" I can link people to? (Other than the transcript of Simple Made Easy)

seancorfield06:02:32

Several of the success stories on http://clojure.org talk about Clojure's simplicity.

seancorfield06:02:40

And the "features" page says "Clojure has a set of useful features that together form a simple, coherent, and powerful tool." (but that's just a statement rather than a compelling argument)

seancorfield06:02:31

Stories -- many of which feature simple/simplicity -- https://clojure.org/community/community_stories

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raspasov13:02:04

What do you guys think of F#? Has anyone used it?

eccentric J03:02:45

I was reading Scott Wlaschin’s Domain Modeling Made Functional for a while which focuses on F#. Seems legit, I have a friend who really likes it and helps with the reddit board. I also think one of the hosts of Coder Radio really likes it too.

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Aaron West15:02:56

That must be almost the pinnacle of "off-topic"? I liked and used F#, as an alternative to C# (or PowerShell), when in Windows environments, for writing short programs or scripts for testing of MS SQL database queries or Analysis Services MDX (or DAX) queries. I think the type system tries to stay out of the way as much as it can, although if I were to compare to Clojure, I suppose the ML family languages may result in more code that converts from one "shape" (type) to another than typical idiomatic Clojure code using maps. (But this comparison doesn't feel right to me, because you still have to match the keys of the map when you are pulling data out of it?)

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chepprey15:02:46

There's also #other-languages where this is on topic:grin: