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#jobs-discuss
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2018-08-22
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mexisme10:08:36

so far, i've worked-out the only way to do it is introduce it by stealth

dm310:08:38

very much depends on the organisation

dm310:08:29

the best way is to get buy-in from above

nilrecurring10:08:21

In our case we have “trust” from above (as in: the management is reasonable and understands our reasonings for doing things in a certain way), which I could really recommend as a way of doing things

mexisme11:08:02

ah, i think you misunderstand — the key word is "introduction" it's much easier to persuade someone if you have something to show them that they are otherwise also interested in

nilrecurring11:08:55

Yep I think I got it 🙂 I introduced Clojure in multiple companies during my career, and in the current one we had no issue in in introducing Haskell (which is not exactly mainstream), because people trusts that we’re taking a responsible decision in doing so

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alexlynham10:08:12

ahhh trust, that would be nice

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vemv10:08:50

I find the https://juxt.pro/ landing page (+ the video you can find there) a good example of how to 'sell' Clojure... namely mentioning Clojure at the very end, as a 'by the way'. If one puts a lot of focus on a specific technology (whether on pros or cons), highlighting it as some kind of special or risky choice, the client will hesitate. Better to take 'Clojure is a proven technology' as a matter of fact.

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alexlynham10:08:29

in an ideal world you wouldn't have to mention it at all, it's an implementation detail and outcomes matter more than how the sausage is made

Aleksander10:08:21

it does matter when you need other people then you working on it

Aleksander10:08:29

which will happen earlier or later

alexlynham10:08:31

yeah, but you can teach anything to smart people

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vemv10:08:01

Plus in every country there are great devs dying to get a clj gig

Aleksander10:08:24

in the UK there is a shortage of them ….

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alexlynham10:08:47

yeah we're unicorns :unicorn_face:

vemv10:08:55

I know of a UK company who hired two Barcelona devs recently. It's pretty great for everyone involved (some costs are saved, devs get a remote setting)

alexlynham10:08:24

I think the issue in the UK is that most clj devs have a few years, are spread around the UK and want part/full remote

alexlynham10:08:43

if I have a house in Manchester, London 5 days a week is... not appetising

danm14:08:59

And here was me worrying about getting a Clojure job if I move on from here and want to stay in it...

danm14:08:30

Mind you, I wouldn't want to live/work in London, and I find working with people in person much preferable to remote, so that would probably significantly limit me

danm14:08:44

Also currently I have no real knowledge of cljs, only clj

alexlynham16:08:09

clojure is a double edged sword for jobs, for sure

alexlynham16:08:16

you want at least another lang to fall back on

alexlynham16:08:46

for me, python/ruby/js are how I'd expect a lot of my work will go from here, but I still default to clj

roklenarcic16:08:00

Yeah most Clj jobs are US or London

roklenarcic16:08:41

Expensive locations

shan16:08:39

there seems to be a few in Bristol (which is still pretty expensive) and Berlin pop up

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scriptor16:08:34

some of the US ones are remote

Aleksander18:08:33

I was mostly talking about London - yes. But there are Clojure gigs in Bristol, Glasgow and other UK cities as well - although probably less …