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#jobs-discuss
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2017-03-24
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fellshard19:03:27

The top paying languages in France... 😧

seancorfield19:03:37

Python is also equal 1st in Germany (and gets about $10k more than France). Interesting that TypeScript comes out on top in UK and Germany (equal 1st). All indicators of a small, and somewhat self-selecting, group of respondents. UK sample size = Germany + France together. A total of only 3,000 respondents across all three countries.

seancorfield19:03:05

Even the US only having 3,600 respondents is a pretty small sample size.

fellshard19:03:38

Yeah, the StackOverflow survey is always pretty small, and I suspect comes with its own biases - as seen in the respondent sources in the survey's methodology.

dottedmag19:03:31

Barring bizarre ideas like 1mln highly paid respondents using Clojure in Zimbabwe

seancorfield19:03:50

@dottedmag I suspect a very small sample of Clojure developers scattered across countries that aren’t UK, US, Germany, or France? Netherlands, perhaps, or Australia?

seancorfield19:03:05

But that also suggests any samples of Clojure developers in those four listed countries are low paid… which seems… odd too.

seancorfield19:03:38

Mostly the survey's results seem extremely suspect to me, to be honest.

dottedmag19:03:04

Or there are too few Clojure developers in these three countries ($72k wouldn't make US top list anyway). There is probably some filtering on the basis of number of responses, or a single INTERCAL developer being paid excessive amounts of money would skew the results.

bja21:03:54

If I ever get a salary survey I'm listing INTERCAL as my language

bja21:03:44

anecdotally, the salary of a clojure developer in Chicago area is north of 120K, depends on experience/person/company how much north

dottedmag21:03:32

Most likely they don't hang out on SO that much 🙂

fellshard22:03:29

But that means living in Chicago area...

seancorfield22:03:16

Re: SO survey — methodology: "We excluded respondents who completed the entire survey in less than 10 minutes.” — so people who read fast and type/click fast were removed from the survey 🙂 I am pretty sure I took the survey, but I don’t remember how long it took. Back to the Clojure salary “quirk”, the graphic that compares language and years of experience with salary showed that Clojure, F#, Perl, and Smalltalk all had higher-than-average experience, and if you extrapolate out through the Rust / Go / Scala / Erlang data points, Clojure’s salary point is in line with those, just augmented by experience: https://cdn.sstatic.net/Research/Img/2017/SalaryAndExperienceByLanguage.svg?v=620358b56236

camdenclark22:03:22

@seancorfield Interesting, in their methodology do they ask what languages you use at work or for hobby/personal projects?

camdenclark22:03:35

Or do they just ask what programming languages you know?

seancorfield23:03:36

As I recall, it was specifically what you use for work.

seancorfield23:03:15

There were one or two questions about whether you also programmed “for fun” outside work and what nature that took, I think.

fellshard23:03:28

I do think they ask some of the right questions, I'm just not sure they have a diverse sampling.