Clojurians
#clojuredesign-podcast
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2019-08-24
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nate00:08:03

oh, definitely, that's a great idea

nate00:08:14

we haven't done that yet, but we'll put it on our list

jrotenberg01:08:36

i bounce around between emacs, vim/tmux, and intellij cursive

jrotenberg01:08:50

but i'd love to hear about your preferences

nate01:08:33

does one stick out as your favorite?

jrotenberg02:08:08

when i started with clojure, emacs was really the only game in town

jrotenberg02:08:43

clojure 1.3 era

jrotenberg02:08:25

maybe ~5 years ago i just wanted a change so i started experimenting with vim (for clojure, i had used vi/vim plenty otherwise)

jrotenberg02:08:49

and then when i took a job writing clojure full time i went all in and used vim the whole time

jrotenberg03:08:29

after that project tanked, though, i was writing java and scala daily and using intellij, so i decided to give cursive a try just to see

jrotenberg03:08:05

so, to answer your question, i'd say emacs is still my "favorite" just because i've used it the most and i feel like my muscle memory is best there

jrotenberg03:08:45

but vim is really nice too and has a feel to it that i really enjoy: more lightweight, maybe

jrotenberg03:08:14

and then of course, despite being an anti-ide guy for a long time, once i got comfortable with intellij in general cursive felt a bit more natural

jrotenberg03:08:40

i've toyed with vscode and atom (for clojure), but never really tried that hard

jrotenberg03:08:22

i just recently started completely from scratch on an emacs setup again and i'm liking it

jrotenberg03:08:42

cider does everything (and more than i need i think)

nate03:08:12

Wow. Interesting.

jrotenberg03:08:19

but i do always have intellij open these days (ugh, java again) so its tempting to just have that open as well for my little side project(s)

nate03:08:35

Heh, definitely.

nate03:08:42

I hope I'm not spoiling a future episode too much, but my environment of choice is neovim with the conjure plugin.

jrotenberg03:08:38

probably not spoiling it, no. an overview of the landscape plus maybe a discussion of common features would probably be a good approach

nate03:08:20

I've been using vim straight for 23 years or so.

jrotenberg03:08:49

hmmm, haven't even looked at that

nate03:08:57

I took a professional break from it when I wrote java, used IntelliJ for that.

jrotenberg03:08:00

and i've kind of resisted really getting neovim going (for no good reason)

jrotenberg03:08:40

i like a relatively minimal setup

nate03:08:41

For a vim user, it's got some niceties. Although much of the cool stuff has gotten into vim too.

jrotenberg03:08:02

i want an editor, a repl and a terminal

jrotenberg03:08:15

i want to be able to reload stuff into the repl easily

jrotenberg03:08:18

i want paredit

nate03:08:22

Haha. That's me too. Well, plus a decent number of plugins.

jrotenberg03:08:25

automagic formatting

jrotenberg03:08:34

good syntax highlighting

jrotenberg03:08:50

those are my real requirements

nate03:08:03

I've never tried paredit. Structural editing with vim-sexp has been great. I'd like to try it though.

jrotenberg03:08:31

paredit is nice

jrotenberg03:08:01

thats awesome, i have it open a lot heh

nate03:08:54

It's amazing to me that there are so many workflows in the clojure community. I was in a meetup and even all 5 vim users had different ways of evaluating code.

jrotenberg03:08:50

its no wonder new people are scared off by it

stefan.van.den.oord05:08:32

I would like to listen to that episode about editors. I would love to see Nightcode mentioned in there as an awesome getting-started-without-friction (learning) tool!

stefan.van.den.oord05:08:48

(I don’t have any stake in it, I just think it is very well done and deserves mentioning)