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#clojure-uk
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2018-09-26
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jasonbell08:09:26

Morning friends

peterwestmacott08:09:38

has anyone used enlive on XML?

peterwestmacott08:09:53

(other than HTML, which is obviously a kind of XML)

jasonbell08:09:52

What would the payoff be compared to using clojure.data.xml ?

peterwestmacott08:09:42

output that looks like hiccup input rather than what you get from clojure.data.xml

peterwestmacott08:09:00

the c.d.xml stuff is quite convenient, but it’s a pain to eyeball

peterwestmacott08:09:12

it was more curiosity than anything else

peterwestmacott08:09:55

the c.d.xml stuff is well structured though, so it’s trivial enough to convert it

guy09:09:02

you could always try clj-xpath

maleghast09:09:35

Mmmmm... X-Path... Happy memories. πŸ™‚

maleghast09:09:39

Morning Everyone πŸ™‚

jasonbell09:09:23

XPath was a joy in Java.

Conor09:09:09

XPath is a joy any time

dominicm09:09:35

If I was asked to query xml today, I would use @tbaldridge's Odin

guy09:09:11

ooh sounds cool, link it πŸ˜„ @dominicm

practicalli09:09:15

Last night's Clojure dojo diversity stats Gender diversity 40% Racial diversity 20% Geographical diversity 30% Beginning Clojure journey 70%

guy09:09:05

How did you figure out the stats πŸ€”

practicalli10:09:48

We just talked to each other πŸ™‚

maleghast10:09:37

Nice πŸ™‚

guy09:09:14

Questionnaire ?

maleghast10:09:10

That’s amazing @jr0cket

alexlynham10:09:40

last time I had to mess around with xml in clojure I ended up writing a fair few macros

3Jane10:09:37

this is relevant to my interests btw, have you seen a better different option than xpath for specifying a pattern match on a tree?

yogidevbear11:09:58

Morning πŸ™‚ I shared this in #news-and-articles earlier: https://increment.com/programming-languages/crash-course-in-compilers/ I thought this was a really well written post.

jasonbell12:09:18

I mean I could change my morning greeting to "Morning friends and that benevolent despotic dictator" so you don't feel left out...... πŸ˜‰

Ben Hammond12:09:51

could be helpful, depending on what you need to do

jasonbell12:09:51

Forgot about Specter, most excellent

otfrom12:09:13

I'm definitely not benevolent and no one listens to me so I'm not a dictator

manas_marthi08:09:54

This would be a funny punch line in twitter bio

Ben Hammond12:09:55

haha! given the ubiquity of voice-to-text software aren'tt we all dictators?

Ben Hammond13:09:07

oh no Alexa is down

Ben Hammond13:09:11

perhaps not today

jasonbell13:09:22

@ben.hammond I miss Hecuba too.

otfrom13:09:12

@ben.hammond badum tish!

Ben Hammond13:09:27

in my days of xml wrangling I used https://clojure.github.io/data.zip/ and it felt very similliar to xpath

maleghast13:09:12

I am amused to admit that I would love to have a good reason to use Clojure and XML together.

Conor13:09:11

Go and work with @carr0t at the BBC, then πŸ˜‰

danm14:09:29

I would much rather use proper xpath than data.zip, but sadly most libs that do xpath only really do it for reading, rather than updates etc as well

danm14:09:33

So data.zip is what we have

danm14:09:44

Every time I have to deal with XML in any other language, I wish it did it as well as xquery. Any time I have to do anything that isn't XML manipulation in xquery I wish I wasn't using xquery...

Conor14:09:10

It's Turing complete, stop complaining

Conor14:09:20

You can fold-left and everything

maleghast14:09:36

Hey @carr0t - Where are you working for Aunty and on what tweam?

maleghast14:09:27

I worked at the Beeb 3 times 2010-2015, the last time as a perm, team-lead.

maleghast14:09:16

Last gig was World Service πŸ™‚

danm14:09:43

Programme Metadata, up in Salford. So PIPs and Nitro, both of which you may have heard of, are our old products. And our new workflows are Clojure microservices working on data from PIPs

maleghast14:09:35

@carr0t - I do know both PIPs and Nitro, as well as Dynamite, though it sounds as though that may have FINALLY been retired... I worked for Radio and Music for a while and ended up having to get my head round quite a lot of the Programme Metadata stuff. Glad to hear that it's getting the Clojure treatment πŸ™‚

maleghast14:09:33

I never worked at Media City - never even got a visit in - but I was born in Manchester and my parents live about 30 minutes by car from the Quays, so you are in the part of the country that is closest to my heart, working for my all-time favourite employer (except my current one, natch), doing Clojure on key infra / systems. I would say you are a lucky man, @carr0t πŸ™‚

danm14:09:32

Well, if you ever fancy a visit... πŸ˜‰

danm14:09:39

Dynamite was 'running, but not in use' before I started in 2015. They finally actually turned it off and decommed the servers about 6 months back I think? Maybe a year

Conor14:09:33

I think I was still there when it happened

alexlynham15:09:39

spent today smashing out a graphql endpoint on azure functions

alexlynham15:09:23

have to admit the azure functions local scaffolding isn't bad, feels less of a pain than the AWS SAM stuff too... though with AWS you'd just use serverless framework because it's feature complete and better

alexlynham15:09:39

mad how quickly you can build a microservice that's flexible these days

maleghast15:09:58

I know it's off-topic, but I built a bunch of things year before last in The Philippines, on top of AWS Lambda with an amazing framework in Python, called Zappa.

maleghast15:09:23

Blew me away how quickly one could have a working, powerful, reliable workflow for some thing or other.

alexlynham16:09:15

yeah we looked at zappa and then basically rolled our own (different team, diff project, diff constraints)

alexlynham16:09:21

it looked ace tho

alexlynham16:09:51

all python or nodejs here tho, no cljs in the day job 😞

maleghast16:09:52

@alex.lynham - Where in the World are you..?

alexlynham17:09:38

In Manchester in the UK