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#cider
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2018-04-20
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bozhidar05:04:00

@arrdem When you set connection dispatch to static there’s a command for setting the default connection. The dynamic dispatch doesn’t work very well with connections to the same project, as it uses the project directory to select the right connection. At some point I really need to sit down and think more about the connection switching.

arrdem05:04:52

@bozhidar honestly just being able to click on the CIDER connection in the status bar and pick which connection is active mysef\lf would be fine

dpsutton05:04:55

I've never used static before. Didn't really know the rationale. Thanks

dpsutton05:04:29

I think it's time to abandon vispinu vision of the connection manager

bozhidar05:04:33

@arrdem That seems like a pretty cool idea! And a relatively easy to implement.

arrdem05:04:45

I was very confused when that wasn't how it worked 😛

dpsutton05:04:46

Would have been nice for a general emacs connection manager but it hasn't materialized

bozhidar05:04:56

@dpsutton There used to be just static dispatch, but it was annoying for people using multiple projects, so I came up with the dynamic concept at some point, but I didn’t think much about some of the implications in the beginning - like what to do with connections without a project, multiple connections for the same project, etc. Then cljs conns came along and made the dynamic stuff even more complex. 😄

dpsutton05:04:32

Yeah for sure. The cljc stuff is still a little undefined at times

dpsutton05:04:45

And I think having two cljs connections really throws it

bozhidar05:04:48

I really don’t think it’s rocket science to make things work even without a fancy session manager. Someone just needs to think on this for a few days and implement something that’s actually consistent and reasonably well thought out.

dpsutton05:04:57

Yeah I agree

dpsutton05:04:08

I was happy to have it for free but we never got it

dpsutton05:04:27

And his branch was sitting there with the promise of work but he got busy and had a child I think

dpsutton05:04:49

But he's done some quite involved work and refactor. Particularly the debugger

bozhidar05:04:47

Indeed. He helped with many important improvements, it’s a pity he doesn’t have time for CIDER these days.

dpsutton05:04:07

I don't want to seem uncharitable. But I think the session stuff is time.

dpsutton05:04:05

I think cursive has an easier time because each instance of it intellj bounds the connections. But in emacs you could visit files from many projects

bozhidar05:04:13

Same goes for @malabarba - he was so instrumental in many of the key features back in the day. It’s very depressing to see great people come and go. Seems I’m the only one left from the beginning. Everyone else retired for one reason or another.

dpsutton05:04:35

My co-workers can have three or four different instances running

dpsutton05:04:52

Yeah I miss his endless knowledge and patience

bozhidar05:04:27

Well, you know what happened to him - he became a Ruby developer. 😄

dpsutton05:04:37

No I never knew what happened. I guess he's at a company that doesn't allow open source

bozhidar06:04:28

I think he’s just pretty busy. While he was doing a lot of open-source he was a PhD student and had a lot of free time on his hands, but I think afterwards he got very focused on his job.

bozhidar06:04:05

That happens. When I started working on CIDER I had orders of magnitude more free time and things were happening at a different pace. Putting some much time in a project that’s just a hobby is a huge investment for me. I guess I love all of you too much! 😄

arrdem06:04:08

I should have fixed the style issues on my cider-nrepl pr. Travis is being slow so I'm packing it in. will try to finish the emacs side of content type handlers and maybe connection switching.

bozhidar06:04:09

> Travis is being slow so I’m packing it in.

bozhidar06:04:27

I’m thinking more and more about using CircleCI instead. Travis has been abysmally slow lately.

ag19:04:23

yes! Circle is awesome. And not because it was built with Clojure and Clojurescript

ag19:04:58

but that too

dominicm07:04:03

I guess the trick is getting new people :) and funding them.

bozhidar07:04:14

@dominicm True. I still have this pipe dream that some Clojure company would be interested to fund the development of essential tooling for a year or two. So much can be done for nrepl, cider-nrepl, orchard and cljs-tooling that’s going to be meaningful outside cider as well. But companies relatively care about such investments. But when I decide to change jobs I certainly plan to do some fund raiser and try to spend working for a few months on tooling just for fun and relaxations.

bozhidar07:04:00

The past 6 years as a technical executive have been quite stressful to say the least. 😄

dominicm07:04:30

Clojurists Together probably couldn't fund a full few months at this point, but I'm not certain. Probably worth finding out.

bozhidar07:04:08

I guess that’s another reason why I love working on oss projects so much - a breath of fresh air after a day of meetings, dramas and bullshit. 😄

bozhidar07:04:21

They can provide $1800/month.

danielcompton08:04:01

We haven’t got the exact $ amount determined yet, but I’ll get it soon. It should be in that ballpark though

danielcompton08:04:51

I would love to be able to fund someone full time but we don’t have enough support yet

benedek08:04:10

I have the same dreams @bozhidar one of the reasons i started contracting again. So i can take breaks between gigs and focus on family and oss. Which esentially means funding my own oss work... Wonder nowadays how this will work out.

benedek08:04:55

I also have the same reasons for loving oss, the ppl and the fresh air, diff perspective it gives

blueberry13:04:56

@bozhidar (un)fortunately, it usually works in a way that you have to start that company, use clojure/cider as a competitive advantage, but still decide to sponsor it as an open-source project. big companies seem to rarely fund oss projects that they didn't start themselves...