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#beginners
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2015-09-12
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kyle_schmidt04:09:34

I am new to clojure (and Emacs). Do you recommend using Emacs Live as a quick way to get up and running?

seancorfield04:09:16

We've standardized on it at work and really helps take a lot of information overload out of trying to figure out an Emacs setup simple_smile

seancorfield04:09:19

The nice think about Emacs Live is that it's carefully curated and used by quite a lot of people, so it's developed carefully and slowly and pretty well tested, @kyle_schmidt

kyle_schmidt04:09:49

Thanks @seancorfield!

mosho10:09:18

I have a simple side-project to do at work and I'd like to leverage clojure(script). It's basically a static HTML page, that needs to work on various devices. I plan to make it be the bare minimum for each device using adaptive design and I figured I could make a clojure(script) program to create each of those, to render on the server and send to clients. I don't plan to actually include clojurescript on the page as like I said, it's almost completely static. I thought I would use hiccup, but reagent/om is also a possibility. Does anyone have any pointers?

meow15:09:43

@mosho: ClojureScript gets compiled to Javascript, and if the resulting page will be static, then there isn't much of a reason to use ClojureScript or Om or Reagent. You can, however, use Clojure on the server to render the page and then more traditional approaches like Luminus that @beppu pointed to would be a good fit.

mosho17:09:14

@beppu @meow after moving from angular to react I decided to move away from templating and HTML (and even CSS) in general

mosho17:09:25

Which is why hiccup/Om/Reagent look great. The idea is to use them merely for their server-side rendering capabilities

mosho17:09:14

I'm just not sure how feasible that is, although I think it would be a breeze in React, so I guessed it would work fine in clojure(script)