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#babashka
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2020-10-30
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borkdude17:10:05

I'm considering running a babashka questionnaire in December to learn what people are using babashka for, what they find lacking or redundant. If you would like to feature a question in the questionnaire, please respond in thread.

holmdunc13:10:37

Whether implicit printing of the last evaluation in the script to stdout should be enabled by default

✔️ 1
borkdude13:10:51

Thanks. If you don't want this, you can end the script with nil.

holmdunc13:10:41

Is the intention that it's a kind of safety net, i.e. "you forgot to do something with this value"?

borkdude13:10:45

It's more historical consistency with -e "(+ 1 2 3)"

holmdunc13:10:51

In a #! interpreter for a general-purpose language, I don't think there's much precedent for doing it. But then again, many of them aren't functional/expression-based.

borkdude13:10:59

I'll include the question

👍 1
borkdude19:10:58

I'm slightly worried that with org.httpkit.client some people will run into the issues that it consumes the entire request / response into memory. I hadn't seen those issues before I added it and people were mostly positive about httpkit. Maybe people don't do huge requests mostly? cc @alekcz360

rwstauner21:10:25

yeah, for small use cases it's super handy and IMO if you build something big enough that it needs to be optimized you could probably stand to make a clojure project out of it

rwstauner21:10:18

your image_viewer example is absurdly handy

lukasz21:10:30

+1, I'm using it to get JSON payloads from servers, I wouldn't use it to process files etc - we have "big" Clojure for that

borkdude22:10:19

makes sense. also big files you can do with babashka.curl as well which won't hold it in memory at once when streaming